Capturing the Entrepreneurial Spirit: Sheila Lirio Marcelo

First Republic Bank

First Republic client, Sheila Lirio Marcelo is an entrepreneur and founder of, an online platform that allows users to identify child care, senior care, special needs care, tutoring and housekeeping services. Having been placed in the difficult situation of having to find both child care for her young son and senior care for her elderly father, Sheila founded to generate more support options for families.

Sheila and her husband Ron, relatively new clients to the Bank, have found that First Republic is very similar to – working efficiently and leaving clients with greater peace of mind. Learn more about why Sheila and Ron Marcelo bank with First Republic.

Here, Sheila shares with us her insights on working with people, adding value to the world, and balancing the roles of being a mother and a business owner.


When I graduated from Harvard I didn’t sleep very much and I was an intense person; it was very much black and white, and I always said that there were really no grays.  If you missed a deadline, you missed a deadline. I wasn’t as understanding about the context of people’s lives and other priorities, but the reality is that building great companies is about building it with an amazing team of people - you can’t do it on your own. There is a notion of more than one right way, and there is a notion that letting people build things that they can be proud of results in even greater outcomes. More importantly, it means they pour their hearts and souls into something that is about helping other people.


There are two important things for entrepreneurs and it’s a combination of the two P’s in my life: people and passion. It’s critical that you stay grounded and understand the importance of your team and building terrific companies and products - it’s about the people, and who you are building it for.  As for the passion, if you’re driven by something and if you believe in something, it will make all the difference, not only in your daily life, but what you decide to leave on this earth for other people and how you help them.


A key thing about being an entrepreneur is this authenticity of bringing your whole self to what you believe in. This includes a combination of your passion, what you want to try and achieve in life, how you want to add value and significance to this world, and how you want to make a difference in people’s lives on your teams. I think that those are key ingredients to helping drive and motivate. Yes, there is success, there is money, and all of that but I think that if those equations of things that you’re truly passionate about are there, there is no question that you will lead a more successful and happier life.


It doesn’t matter who you’re talking to, you’ve got to talk to the people the exact same way and if you do you’ll get much more respect from senior people. In fact, that’s something I pay attention to when deciding whether I want to do business with someone, I pay attention to whether or not they are being respectful to an airline attendant or a waitress, you name it. I think it’s very important.


I think keeping a journal is really important because it’s a way to be more self-aware, and to learn about yourself.  I am a big believer in evolutions, not revolutions, and that it’s about testing and iterating.  No matter what age you are, I have a firm belief that people can change, and that change can only come from your own choices, and journaling brings you closer to that self-awareness and that evolution.


My main focus ever since I was a teenager has been about managing efficiency, it’s very important to me. As busy moms and busy entrepreneurs, we focus so much on managing time that you become obsessed with it, but the reality is that living life is about the moment. If you are always focused on time, you lose those special moments, and they are so critical - I have this mantra that wherever I go, I try to really live that moment and pay attention to what I’m doing.

The views of the authors of these articles do not necessarily represent the views of First Republic Bank.