6 Money Mindset Hacks for Entrepreneurs: Part 2

Ginger Dean, Contributor, Forbes
February 28, 2018

In the first installment of this series, we discussed the foundational mindset hacks needed to set your plan in motion towards consistent income. This includes setting the intention, identifying your money blocks and forgiving your financial past.

Now we’ll cover the last three steps needed to generate consistent income in your business.

Let’s take a look at what’s needed to set all of this in motion towards your goals.


This money mindset hack isn’t always obvious to everyone because the connection isn’t always understood. If you remember the “mirror effect” example from part 1 then you understand that clutter in your external world is often indicative of the clutter present in your internal world.

Clutter often creates feelings of disorganization and chaos which is often born out of a similar mindset.

How successful can you really become in your business if you're chronically disorganized and fighting chaos?

You won’t get very far since clutter promotes procrastination and limits your potential because of the stagnant disorganized feelings related to that mental and physical space.

Even if we become moderately successful, mounting clutter in our physical space will always feel like a struggle. And, as we discussed in part 1, your feelings around your business are important to your success.

Taking massive action

This is important. Yet you’d still be surprised how many of us create the best business and financial plans and fail to take massive action. Massive action creates momentum.

It’s one thing to set up a savings account but quite another to set in motion the plans to follow through with the transfer and watch it grow. Think of massive action as the gasoline you need to take you from A to B.

You can’t get anywhere in your car if your foot isn’t on the gas pedal.  Of course, you need a map to your destination but you’ll be sitting in your driveway as long as your feet are planted on the floor of the car vs. the gas pedal.

Detach from the outcome

After everything we’ve discussed around taking action, it’s time to step away from your attachment to the outcome. This seems simple enough but perhaps the most difficult for most entrepreneurs to put into practice because it means carrying on with your life as if it’s already happened.

The more you apply forceful energy to create an outcome, the less likely it will happen. Your job is simply to carry on as if it has already happened. When you place your order at a restaurant, I’m pretty sure you don’t obsess whether the kitchen received your order. You simply know it’s coming.

The same applies for your mundane plans to go to the grocery store later or turn on the lights in your basement. You just know that when you take action, the desired outcome will manifest. The same applies for your business.

Implement the hacks detailed above and in the first installment of this series, but in the end, your job is simply to live in the detached space that it has already happened. In that space, you aren’t creating the possibilities for all the reasons for why it won’t happen. That just creates more negative energy which fuels your brain’s search for validation as to why it won’t work.

Striking an ideal balance between a strong business acumen and mindset can seem difficult since we’ve mostly been taught to “work hard” towards our goals with the expectation of our desired results.

However, once you understand that both are required for success then you’ll eventually work to incorporate both a consistent mindset practice as well as taking massive action towards your goals.


This article was written by Ginger Dean from Forbes and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

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